Hopefully you caught part 1 in this series on how Obesity is a very real and scary health risk. Its definitely worth going back to look for!

Ok, I’m going to start with this again:

Obesity is a serious medical condition.

Some of the health risks are associated with obesity:

  1. Higher risk of morbidity from hypertension
  2. Type 2 diabetes
  3. Coronary heart disease
  4. Stroke
  5. Gallbladder disease
  6. Osteoarthritis (a breakdown of cartilage and bone within a joint)
  7. Sleep apnea and respiratory problems
  8. Cancers such as endometrial, breast, prostate, and colon cancers
  9. Mental Illness such as clinical depression, anxiety and others

In 1998 an estimated 97 million adults in the United States were overweight or obese. Alarm about the increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity in the United States in recent years centers on the link between obesity and increased health risks, which translates into increased medical care and disability costs. The total cost attributable to obesity amounted to $99.2 billion in 1995. Approximately $51.6 billion of these dollars were direct medical costs associated with diseases attributable to obesity.

The CDC has published that the medical care costs of obesity in the United States are high. In 2008 dollars, these costs were estimated to now be $147 billion. That has almost doubled in 13 years!

The direct costs also associated with obesity represent 5.7 percent of the national health expenditure within the United States. The indirect costs attributable to obesity are $47.6 billion and are comparable to the economic costs of cigarette smoking. Indirect costs represent the value of lost output caused by morbidity and mortality, and may have a greater impact than direct costs at the personal and societal levels.
Current estimates are that 69 percent of adults are either overweight or obese, with approximately 35 percent obese.

As a major contributor to preventive death in the United States today, overweight and obesity pose a major public health challenge. Not only is the prevalence of this serious medical condition soaring among adults (between 1960 and 1994, overweight increased from 30.5 to 32 percent among adults ages 20 to 74 and obesity increased from 12.8 percent to 22.5 percent), but it is also affecting ever greater numbers of American youth and exacting a particularly harsh toll from low income women and minorities.

So what can we do about it? Part 3 in this series is next…

Need some help to get started? Schedule your free consultation HERE and get your life back on the right track. Families are welcome.

To your health,

Andrea

Andrea Bauer
Head Nutrition Coach
CrossFit PTC
(678) 519-2302
http://www.crossfitptc.com
andrea@crossfitptc.com

CF-L2, CF Kids, USAW
Precision Nutrition L-1
Healthy Steps Nutrition Certified

References:
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/files/docs/guidelines/ob_gdlns.pdf)- NIH PUBLICATION NO. 98-4083 SEPTEMBER 1998 NATIONAL INSTITUTES O F HEALTH
https://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/effects/index.html
15Finkelstein EA1, Trogdon JG, Cohen JW, Dietz W. Annual medical spending attributable to obesity: payer-and service-specific estimates. Health Aff (Millwood). 2009 Sep-Oct;28(5):w822-31. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.28.5.w822.

https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/overweight-and-obesity